Geophysical tools are useful for many kinds of buried metal detection: delineating landfills, detecting buried storage tanks and drums, locating rebar in concrete, finding unexploded ordnance, and other buried metallic objects.  Ferrous metal causes a response in magnetometer data, and both ferrous and non-ferrous metal are detectable with time-domain electromagnetic tools. Ground penetrating radar is often able to delineate both metallic and nonmetallic buried objects.  Which tool is most appropriate for your project depends on project objectives and site conditions.  We've implemented these tools successfully at remote sites throughout Alaska for environmental, engineering, and residential applications. If you need to find buried metal, call us to discuss!

Removing debris, discovered with the EM-61 metal detector, from a landfill in Northern Alaska

Removing debris, discovered with the EM-61 metal detector, from a landfill in Northern Alaska

Landfill delineation

All three tools (magnetometers, metal detectors, and GPR) can be effective at defining landfill boundaries and estimating debris volumes.  We carefully assess the site conditions, including soil properties, regional geology, and expected debris types, to decide which tool will help your project be successful.  We often perform repeat surveys after landfill remediation to document that removal efforts have been comprehensive and successful.

 


Rebar and Cables in Concrete

Rebar and other objects cables in concrete make excellent targets for ground-penetrating radar tools.  For example, the image on the right is a depth slice of a plan view through a processed gridded data , showing clearly rebar locations in red.  The leftmost diagonal red line is likely a heating line, which can often be distinguished from rebar due its location and depth. We can quickly and accurately process the data and provide surface marking or diagrams indicating interpreted rebar/PT locations to guide coring positions, concrete repair projects, or other concrete work.

 

Rebar structure (red) and heating line (left) in concrete delineated using ground penetrating radar

Rebar structure (red) and heating line (left) in concrete delineated using ground penetrating radar


Removing an underground storage tank from a contaminated site

Removing an underground storage tank from a contaminated site

Underground Storage Tanks and Drums

Underground storage tanks (USTs) and buried waste drums are potential targets for the EM-61, a time domain metal detector.  This tool can often be rapidly and robustly deployed in remote environments and cold weather conditions, making it an ideal tool for Alaska.  Data anomalies may be well-correlated with tank and/or drum position, and data collection is time- and cost-effective.

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Processed data map showing locations of buried drums (pink anomalies) and outline of a buried building foundation in lower center.